Reloading - How to not be a noob [p4]

Honestly, this is a little bit of an embarrassing guide to write. Most of these tips and tricks are things that I learned first-hand. I hope this guide proves to be handy and at the very least helps whet your appetite for reloading and the shooting sports. If you have questions or if there’s an issue with this guide, please let me know at roblund@theredhoodie.com.


If you break the decapping pin, you don’t need to buy a new die

Say you break the decapping pin off of your die. Maybe you did your best gorilla impression and maybe gave that press handle a hefty tug, maybe with a piece of Berdan brass in the press. If that happens to you (which I’m sure it won’t because only an oaf would do something so ridiculous) you DO NOT need to then go buy a new die. Many of your fine reloading suppliers have the decapping pin that you can purchase and just screw back into your die. Just sayin’ :rolleyes:

Why can I not reload steel cases?

Brass is soft, steel is hard. Resizing steel usually causes problems or just plain breaks. Also, many steel cases are foreign and frequently use Berdan style primer cups.

Why you should be careful with case lube

If you use standard sizing dies, you are going to need to use case lube of some kind to make sure your case doesn’t get stuck in the die when it squeezes the case down to the right size. If this happens you will actually need another tool to pull that case back out of the die. On the other side of the coin, if you get too much lube on the case you can actually cause little dents in the neck of the case (assuming you’re reloading rifle rounds here). Basically the excess lube pools up and make a little divot when trying to size the case. So just use a tiny bit of lube so that things run smoothly. Another option is to buy carbide dies, which reduce the chance of a case getting stuck, but are more expensive.

..to be continued